GrabDuck

matzuk/material-dialogs

:

Screenshots

  1. Sample Project
  2. Gradle Dependency
    1. Repository
    2. Core
    3. Commons
  3. What's New
  4. Basic Dialog
  5. Dismissing Dialogs
  6. Migration from AlertDialogs
  7. Displaying an Icon
  8. Stacked Action Buttons
  9. Neutral Action Button
  10. Callbacks
  11. List Dialogs
  12. Single Choice List Dialogs
    1. Coloring Radio Buttons
  13. Multi Choice List Dialogs
    1. Coloring Check Boxes
  14. Assigning IDs to List Item Views
  15. Custom List Dialogs
  16. Custom Views
    1. Later Access
  17. Typefaces
  18. Getting and Setting Action Buttons
  19. Theming
    1. Basics
    2. Colors
    3. Selectors
    4. Gravity
    5. Material Palette
  20. Global Theming
  21. Show, Cancel, and Dismiss Callbacks
  22. Input Dialogs
    1. Coloring the EditText
    2. Limiting Input Length
    3. Custom Invalidation
  23. Progress Dialogs
    1. Proguard
    2. Indeterminate Progress Dialogs
    3. Determinate (Seek Bar) Progress Dialogs
    4. Make an Indeterminate Dialog Horizontal
    5. Coloring the Progress Bar
    6. Custom Number and Progress Formats
  24. Tint Helper
  25. Misc
  1. Color Chooser Dialogs
    1. Finding Visible Dialogs
    2. User Color Input
  2. Folder Selector Dialogs
  3. Preference Dialogs
  4. Simple List Dialogs

You can download the latest sample APK from this repo here: https://github.com/afollestad/material-dialogs/blob/master/sample/sample.apk

It's also on Google Play:

Get it on Google Play

Having the sample project installed is a good way to be notified of new releases. Although Watching this repository will allow GitHub to email you whenever I publish a release.


Release

Repository

First, add the following to your app's build.gradle file:

repositories {
    maven { url "https://jitpack.io" }
}

Core

The core module contains all the major classes of this library, including MaterialDialog and AlertDialogWrapper. You can create basic, list, single/multi choice, progress, input, etc. dialogs with core.

dependencies {

    // ... other dependencies here
    
    compile('com.github.afollestad.material-dialogs:core:0.8.5.0@aar') {
        transitive = true
    }
}

Commons

The commons module contains extensions to the library that not everyone may need. This includes the ColorChooserDialog, FolderChooserDialog, the Material Preference classes, and MaterialSimpleListAdapter/MaterialSimpleListItem.

dependencies {

    // ... other dependencies here
    
    compile('com.github.afollestad.material-dialogs:commons:0.8.5.0@aar') {
        transitive = true
    }
}

It's likely that new extensions will be added to commons later.


See the project's Releases page for a list of versions with their changelogs.

If you Watch this repository, GitHub will send you an email every time I publish an update.


First of all, note that MaterialDialog extends DialogBase, which extends AlertDialog. While a very small number of the stock methods are purposely deprecated and don't work, you have access to methods such as dismiss(), setTitle(), setIcon(), setCancelable(), etc. Alternatives are discussed below.

Here's a basic example that mimics the dialog you see on Google's Material design guidelines (here: http://www.google.com/design/spec/components/dialogs.html#dialogs-usage). Note that you can always substitute literal strings and string resources for methods that take strings, the same goes for color resources (e.g. titleColor and titleColorRes).

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.title)
        .content(R.string.content)
        .positiveText(R.string.agree)
        .negativeText(R.string.disagree)
        .show();

On Lollipop (API 21+) or if you use AppCompat, the Material dialog will automatically match the positiveColor (which is used on the positive action button) to the colorAccent attribute of your styles.xml theme.

If the content is long enough, it will become scrollable and a divider will be displayed above the action buttons.


I've had lots of issues asking how you dismiss a dialog. It works the same way that AlertDialog does, as both AlertDialog and MaterialDialog are an instance of android.app.Dialog (which is where dismiss() and show() come from). You cannot dismiss a dialog using it's Builder. You can only dismiss a dialog using the dialog itself.

There's many ways you can get an instance of MaterialDialog. The two major ways are through the show() and build() methods of MaterialDialog.Builder.

Through show(), which immediately shows the dialog and returns the visible dialog:

MaterialDialog dialog = new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.title)
        .content(R.string.content)
        .positiveText(R.string.agree)
        .show();

Through build(), which only builds the dialog but doesn't show it until you say so:

MaterialDialog.Builder builder = new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.title)
        .content(R.string.content)
        .positiveText(R.string.agree);

MaterialDialog dialog = builder.build();
dialog.show();

Once the dialog is shown, you can dismiss it:

There are other various places where the MaterialDialog instance is given, such as in some callbacks that are discussed in future sections below.


If you're migrating old dialogs you could use AlertDialogWrapper. You need change imports and replace AlertDialog.Builder with AlertDialogWrapper.Builder:

new AlertDialogWrapper.Builder(this)
        .setTitle(R.string.title)
        .setMessage(R.string.message)
        .setNegativeButton(R.string.OK, new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                dialog.dismiss();
            }
        }).show();

But it's highly recommended to use original MaterialDialog API for new usages.


MaterialDialog supports the display of an icon just like the stock AlertDialog; it will go to the left of the title.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.title)
        .content(R.string.content)
        .positiveText(R.string.agree)
        .icon(R.drawable.icon)
        .show();

You can limit the maximum size of the icon using the limitIconToDefaultSize(), maxIconSize(int size), or maxIconSizeRes(int sizeRes) Builder methods.


If you have multiple action buttons that together are too wide to fit on one line, the dialog will stack the buttons to be vertically oriented.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.title)
        .content(R.string.content)
        .positiveText(R.string.longer_positive)
        .negativeText(R.string.negative)
        .show();

You can also force the dialog to stack its buttons with the forceStacking() method of the Builder.


You can specify neutral text in addition to the positive and negative text. It will show the neutral action on the far left.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.title)
        .content(R.string.content)
        .positiveText(R.string.agree)
        .negativeText(R.string.disagree)
        .neutralText(R.string.more_info)
        .show();

As of version 0.8.2.0, the callback() Builder method is deprecated in favor of the individual callback methods discussed below. Earlier versions will still require use of ButtonCallback.

To know when the user selects an action button, you set callbacks:

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
    .onPositive(new MaterialDialog.SingleButtonCallback() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(@NonNull MaterialDialog dialog, @NonNull DialogAction which) {
            // TODO
        }
    })
    .onNeutral(new MaterialDialog.SingleButtonCallback() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(@NonNull MaterialDialog dialog, @NonNull DialogAction which) {
            // TODO
        }
    })
    .onNegative(new MaterialDialog.SingleButtonCallback() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(@NonNull MaterialDialog dialog, @NonNull DialogAction which) {
            // TODO
        }
    })
    .onAny(new MaterialDialog.SingleButtonCallback() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(@NonNull MaterialDialog dialog, @NonNull DialogAction which) {
            // TODO
        }
    });

If you are listening for all three action buttons, you could just use onAny(). The which (DialogAction) parameter will tell you which button was pressed.

If autoDismiss is turned off, then you must manually dismiss the dialog in these callbacks. Auto dismiss is on by default.


Creating a list dialog only requires passing in an array of strings. The callback (itemsCallback) is also very simple.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.title)
        .items(R.array.items)
        .itemsCallback(new MaterialDialog.ListCallback() {
            @Override
            public void onSelection(MaterialDialog dialog, View view, int which, CharSequence text) {
            }
        })
        .show();

If autoDismiss is turned off, then you must manually dismiss the dialog in the callback. Auto dismiss is on by default. You can pass positiveText() or the other action buttons to the builder to force it to display the action buttons below your list, however this is only useful in some specific cases.


Single choice list dialogs are almost identical to regular list dialogs. The only difference is that you use itemsCallbackSingleChoice to set a callback rather than itemsCallback. That signals the dialog to display radio buttons next to list items.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.title)
        .items(R.array.items)
        .itemsCallbackSingleChoice(-1, new MaterialDialog.ListCallbackSingleChoice() {
            @Override
            public boolean onSelection(MaterialDialog dialog, View view, int which, CharSequence text) {
                /**
                 * If you use alwaysCallSingleChoiceCallback(), which is discussed below,
                 * returning false here won't allow the newly selected radio button to actually be selected.
                 **/
                return true;
            }
        })
        .positiveText(R.string.choose)
        .show();

If you want to preselect an item, pass an index 0 or greater in place of -1 in itemsCallbackSingleChoice(). Later, you can update the selected index using setSelectedIndex(int) on the MaterialDialog instance, if you're not using a custom adapter.

If you do not set a positive action button using positiveText(), the dialog will automatically call the single choice callback when user presses the positive action button. The dialog will also dismiss itself, unless auto dismiss is turned off.

If you make a call to alwaysCallSingleChoiceCallback(), the single choice callback will be called every time the user selects an item.

Coloring Radio Buttons

Like action buttons and many other elements of the Material dialog, you can customize the color of a dialog's radio buttons. The Builder class contains a widgetColor(), widgetColorRes(), and widgetColorAttr() method. Their names and parameter annotations make them self explanatory. Note that by default, radio buttons will be colored with the color held in colorAccent (for AppCompat) or android:colorAccent (for the Material theme) in your Activity's theme.

There's also a global theming attribute as shown in the Global Theming section of this README: md_widget_color.


Multiple choice list dialogs are almost identical to regular list dialogs. The only difference is that you use itemsCallbackMultiChoice to set a callback rather than itemsCallback. That signals the dialog to display check boxes next to list items, and the callback can return multiple selections.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.title)
        .items(R.array.items)
        .itemsCallbackMultiChoice(null, new MaterialDialog.ListCallbackMultiChoice() {
            @Override
            public boolean onSelection(MaterialDialog dialog, Integer[] which, CharSequence[] text) {
                /**
                 * If you use alwaysCallMultiChoiceCallback(), which is discussed below,
                 * returning false here won't allow the newly selected check box to actually be selected.
                 * See the limited multi choice dialog example in the sample project for details.
                 **/
                 return true;
            }
        })
        .positiveText(R.string.choose)
        .show();

If you want to preselect any items, pass an array of indices (resource or literal) in place of null in itemsCallbackMultiChoice(). Later, you can update the selected indices using setSelectedIndices(Integer[]) on the MaterialDialog instance, if you're not using a custom adapter.

If you do not set a positive action button using positiveText(), the dialog will automatically call the multi choice callback when user presses the positive action button. The dialog will also dismiss itself, unless auto dismiss is turned off.

If you make a call to alwaysCallMultiChoiceCallback(), the multi choice callback will be called every time the user selects an item.

Coloring Check Boxes

Like action buttons and many other elements of the Material dialog, you can customize the color of a dialog's check boxes. The Builder class contains a widgetColor(), widgetColorRes(), and widgetColorAttr() method. Their names and parameter annotations make them self explanatory. Note that by default, check boxes will be colored with the color held in colorAccent (for AppCompat) or android:colorAccent (for the Material theme) in your Activity's theme.

There's also a global theming attribute as shown in the Global Theming section of this README: md_widget_color.


If you need to keep track of list items by ID rather than index, you can assign item IDs from an integer array:

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.socialNetworks)
        .items(R.array.socialNetworks)
        .itemsIds(R.array.itemIds)
        .itemsCallback(new MaterialDialog.ListCallback() {
            @Override
            public void onSelection(MaterialDialog dialog, View view, int which, CharSequence text) {
                Toast.makeText(Activity.this, which + ": " + text + ", ID = " + view.getId(), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            }
        })
        .show();

You can also pass a literal integer array (int[]) in place of an array resource ID.


Like Android's native dialogs, you can also pass in your own adapter via .adapter() to customize exactly how you want your list to work.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.socialNetworks)
        .adapter(new ButtonItemAdapter(this, R.array.socialNetworks),
                new MaterialDialog.ListCallback() {
                    @Override
                    public void onSelection(MaterialDialog dialog, View itemView, int which, CharSequence text) {
                        Toast.makeText(MainActivity.this, "Clicked item " + which, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                    }
                })
        .show();

If you need access to the ListView, you can use the MaterialDialog instance:

MaterialDialog dialog = new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        ...
        .build();

ListView list = dialog.getListView();
// Do something with it

dialog.show();

Note that you don't need to be using a custom adapter in order to access the ListView, it's there for single/multi choice dialogs, regular list dialogs, etc.


Custom views are very easy to implement.

boolean wrapInScrollView = true;
new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.title)
        .customView(R.layout.custom_view, wrapInScrollView)
        .positiveText(R.string.positive)
        .show();

If wrapInScrollView is true, then the library will place your custom view inside of a ScrollView for you. This allows users to scroll your custom view if necessary (small screens, long content, etc.). However, there are cases when you don't want that behavior. This mostly consists of cases when you'd have a ScrollView in your custom layout, including ListViews, RecyclerViews, WebViews, GridViews, etc. The sample project contains examples of using both true and false for this parameter.

Your custom view will automatically have padding put around it when wrapInScrollView is true. Otherwise you're responsible for using padding values that look good with your content.

Later Access

If you need to access a View in the custom view after the dialog is built, you can use getCustomView() of MaterialDialog. This is especially useful if you pass a layout resource to the Builder, the dialog will handle the view inflation for you.

MaterialDialog dialog = //... initialization via the builder ...
View view = dialog.getCustomView();

If you want to use custom fonts, you can make a call to typeface(String, String) when using the Builder. This will pull fonts from files in your project's assets/fonts folder. For example, if you had Roboto.ttf and Roboto-Light.ttf in /src/main/assets/fonts, you would call typeface("Roboto.ttf", "Roboto-Light.ttf"). This method will also handle recycling Typefaces via the TypefaceHelper which you can use in your own project to avoid duplicate allocations. The raw typeface(Typeface, Typeface) variation will not recycle typefaces, every call will allocate the Typeface again.

There's a global theming attribute available to automatically apply fonts to every Material Dialog in your app, also.


If you want to get a reference to one of the dialog action buttons after the dialog is built and shown (e.g. to enable or disable buttons):

MaterialDialog dialog = //... initialization via the builder ...
View negative = dialog.getActionButton(DialogAction.NEGATIVE);
View neutral = dialog.getActionButton(DialogAction.NEUTRAL);
View positive = dialog.getActionButton(DialogAction.POSITIVE);

If you want to update the title of a dialog action button (you can pass a string resource ID in place of the literal string, too):

MaterialDialog dialog = //... initialization via the builder ...
dialog.setActionButton(DialogAction.NEGATIVE, "New Title");

Before Lollipop, theming AlertDialogs was basically impossible without using reflection and custom drawables. Since KitKat, Android became more color neutral but AlertDialogs continued to use Holo Blue for the title and title divider. Lollipop has improved even more, with no colors in the dialog by default other than the action buttons. This library makes theming even easier.

Basics

By default, Material Dialogs will apply a light theme or dark theme based on the ?android:textColorPrimary attribute retrieved from the context creating the dialog. If the color is light (e.g. more white), it will guess the Activity is using a dark theme and it will use the dialog's dark theme. Vice versa for the light theme. You can manually set the theme used from the Builder#theme() method:

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .content("Hi")
        .theme(Theme.DARK)
        .show();

Or you can use the global theming attribute, which is discussed in the section below. Global theming avoids having to constantly call theme setters for every dialog you show.

Colors

Pretty much every aspect of a dialog created with this library can be colored:

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .titleColorRes(R.color.material_red_500)
        .contentColor(Color.WHITE) // notice no 'res' postfix for literal color
        .linkColorAttr(R.attr.my_link_color_attr)  // notice attr is used instead of none or res for attribute resolving
        .dividerColorRes(R.color.material_pink_500)
        .backgroundColorRes(R.color.material_blue_grey_800)
        .positiveColorRes(R.color.material_red_500)
        .neutralColorRes(R.color.material_red_500)
        .negativeColorRes(R.color.material_red_500)
        .widgetColorRes(R.color.material_red_500)
        .buttonRippleColorRes(R.color.material_red_500)
        .show();

The names are self explanatory for the most part. The widgetColor method, discussed in a few other sections of this tutorial, applies to progress bars, check boxes, and radio buttons. Also note that each of these methods have 3 variations for setting a color directly, using color resources, and using color attributes.

Selectors

Selectors are drawables that change state when pressed or focused.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .btnSelector(R.drawable.custom_btn_selector)
        .btnSelector(R.drawable.custom_btn_selector_primary, DialogAction.POSITIVE)
        .btnSelectorStacked(R.drawable.custom_btn_selector_stacked)
        .listSelector(R.drawable.custom_list_and_stackedbtn_selector)
        .show();

The first btnSelector line sets a selector drawable used for all action buttons. The second btnSelector line overwrites the drawable used only for the positive button. This results in the positive button having a different selector than the neutral and negative buttons. btnSelectorStacked sets a selector drawable used when the buttons become stacked, either because there's not enough room to fit them all on one line, or because you used forceStacked(true) on the Builder. listSelector is used for list items, when you are NOT using a custom adapter.

Note:

An important note related to using custom action button selectors: make sure your selector drawable references inset drawables like the default ones do - this is important for correct action button padding.

Gravity

It's probably unlikely you'd want to change gravity of elements in a dialog, but it's possible.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .titleGravity(GravityEnum.CENTER)
        .contentGravity(GravityEnum.CENTER)
        .btnStackedGravity(GravityEnum.START)
        .itemsGravity(GravityEnum.END)
        .buttonsGravity(GravityEnum.END)
        .show();

These are pretty self explanatory. titleGravity sets the gravity for the dialog title, contentGravity sets the gravity for the dialog content, btnStackedGravity sets the gravity for stacked action buttons, itemsGravity sets the gravity for list items (when you're NOT using a custom adapter).

For, buttonsGravity refer to this:

START (Default) Neutral Negative Positive
CENTER Negative Neutral Positive
END Positive Negative Neutral

With no positive button, the negative button takes it's place except for with CENTER.

Material Palette

To see colors that fit the Material design palette, see this page: http://www.google.com/design/spec/style/color.html#color-color-palette


Most of the theming aspects discussed in the above section can be automatically applied to all dialogs you show from an Activity which has a theme containing any of these attributes:

<style name="AppTheme" parent="Theme.AppCompat.Light.DarkActionBar">

    <!--
        All dialogs will default to Theme.DARK with this set to true.
    -->
    <item name="md_dark_theme">true</item>

    <!--
        This overrides the default dark or light dialog background color.
        Note that if you use a dark color here, you should set md_dark_theme to
        true so text and selectors look visible
    -->
    <item name="md_background_color">#37474F</item>

    <!--
        Applies an icon next to the title in all dialogs.
    -->
    <item name="md_icon">@drawable/ic_launcher</item>
  
    <!--
        Limit icon to a max size.
    -->
    <attr name="md_icon_max_size" format="dimension" />
    
    <!--
        Limit the icon to a default max size (48dp).
    -->
    <attr name="md_icon_limit_icon_to_default_size" format="boolean" />

    <!--
        By default, the title text color is derived from the
        ?android:textColorPrimary system attribute.
    -->
    <item name="md_title_color">#E91E63</item>


    <!--
        By default, the content text color is derived from the
        ?android:textColorSecondary system attribute.
    -->
    <item name="md_content_color">#9C27B0</item>

    <!--
        By default, the link color is derived from the colorAccent attribute 
        of AppCompat or android:colorAccent attribute of the Material theme.
    -->
    <item name="md_link_color">#673AB7</item>

    <!--
        By default, the positive action text color is derived
        from the colorAccent attribute of AppCompat or android:colorAccent
        attribute of the Material theme.
    -->
    <item name="md_positive_color">#673AB7</item>

    <!--
        By default, the neutral action text color is derived
        from the colorAccent attribute of AppCompat or android:colorAccent
        attribute of the Material theme.
    -->
    <item name="md_neutral_color">#673AB7</item>

    <!--
        By default, the negative action text color is derived
        from the colorAccent attribute of AppCompat or android:colorAccent
        attribute of the Material theme.
    -->
    <item name="md_negative_color">#673AB7</item>

    <!--
        By default, a progress dialog's progress bar, check boxes, and radio buttons 
        have a color that is derived from the colorAccent attribute of AppCompat or 
        android:colorAccent attribute of the Material theme.
    -->
    <item name="md_widget_color">#673AB7</item>

    <!--
        By default, the list item text color is black for the light
        theme and white for the dark theme.
    -->
    <item name="md_item_color">#9C27B0</item>

    <!--
        This overrides the color used for the top and bottom dividers used when
        content is scrollable
    -->
    <item name="md_divider_color">#E91E63</item>

    <!--
        This overrides the color used for the ripple displayed on action buttons (Lollipop and above).
        Defaults to the colorControlHighlight attribute from AppCompat OR the Material theme.
    -->
    <item name="md_btn_ripple_color">#E91E63</item>

    <!--
        This overrides the selector used on list items.
    -->
    <item name="md_list_selector">@drawable/selector</item>

    <!--
        This overrides the selector used on stacked action buttons.
    -->
    <item name="md_btn_stacked_selector">@drawable/selector</item>

    <!--
        This overrides the background selector used on the positive action button.
    -->
    <item name="md_btn_positive_selector">@drawable/selector</item>

    <!--
        This overrides the background selector used on the neutral action button.
    -->
    <item name="md_btn_neutral_selector">@drawable/selector</item>

    <!--
        This overrides the background selector used on the negative action button.
    -->
    <item name="md_btn_negative_selector">@drawable/selector</item>
    
    <!-- 
        This sets the gravity used while displaying the dialog title, defaults to start.
        Can be start, center, or end.
    -->
    <item name="md_title_gravity">start</item>
    
    <!-- 
        This sets the gravity used while displaying the dialog content, defaults to start.
        Can be start, center, or end.
    -->
    <item name="md_content_gravity">start</item>
    
    <!--
        This sets the gravity used while displaying the list items (not including custom adapters), defaults to start.
        Can be start, center, or end.
    -->
    <item name="md_items_gravity">start</item>
    
    <!--
        This sets the gravity used while displaying the dialog action buttons, defaults to start.
        
        START (Default)    Neutral     Negative    Positive
        CENTER:            Negative    Neutral     Positive
        END:	           Positive    Negative    Neutral
    -->
    <item name="md_buttons_gravity">start</item>
    
    <!--
        This sets the gravity used while displaying the stacked action buttons, defaults to end.
        Can be start, center, or end.
    -->
    <item name="md_btnstacked_gravity">end</item>

    <!--
        The name of font in assets/fonts used on titles and action buttons
        (null uses device default). E.g. [your-project]/app/main/assets/fonts/[medium]
    -->
    <item name="md_medium_font">Roboto-Medium.ttf</item>

    <!--
        The name of font in assets/fonts used everywhere else, like content and list items
        (null uses device default). E.g. [your-project]/app/main/assets/fonts/[regular]
    -->
    <item name="md_regular_font">Roboto-Medium.ttf</item>

</style>

The action button color is also derived from the android:colorAccent attribute of the Material theme, or colorAccent attribute of the AppCompat Material theme as seen in the sample project. Manually setting the color will override that behavior.


You can directly setup show/cancel/dismiss listeners from the Builder rather than on the resulting MaterialDialog instance.

Also note that the Builder has a cancelable() method that lets you disable dismissing the dialog when you tap outside the dialog window.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
    .title("Use Google's Location Services?")
    .content("Let Google help apps determine location. This means sending anonymous location data to Google, even when no apps are running.")
    .positiveText("Agree")
    .showListener(new DialogInterface.OnShowListener() {
        @Override
        public void onShow(DialogInterface dialog) {
        }
    })
    .cancelListener(new DialogInterface.OnCancelListener() {
        @Override
        public void onCancel(DialogInterface dialog) {
        }
    })
    .dismissListener(new DialogInterface.OnDismissListener() {
        @Override
        public void onDismiss(DialogInterface dialog) {
        }
    })
    .show();

An input dialog is pretty self explanatory, it retrieves input from the user of your application with an input field (EditText). You can also display content above the EditText if you desire.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        .title(R.string.input)
        .content(R.string.input_content)
        .inputType(InputType.TYPE_CLASS_TEXT | InputType.TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_PASSWORD)
        .input(R.string.input_hint, R.string.input_prefill, new MaterialDialog.InputCallback() {
            @Override
            public void onInput(MaterialDialog dialog, CharSequence input) {
                // Do something
            }
        }).show();

The input dialog will automatically handle focusing the EditText and displaying the keyboard to allow the user to immediately enter input. When the dialog is closed, the keyboard will be automatically dismissed.

Note that the dialog will force the positive action button to be visible, when it's pressed the input is submitted to the callback.

Also Note that the call to inputType() is optional.

Coloring the EditText

Like action buttons and many other elements of the Material dialog, you can customize the color of a input dialog's EditText. The Builder class contains a widgetColor(), widgetColorRes(), and widgetColorAttr() method. Their names and parameter annotations make them self explanatory. Note that by default, EditTexts will be colored with the color held in colorAccent (for AppCompat) or android:colorAccent (for the Material theme) in your Activity's theme.

There's also a global theming attribute as shown in the Global Theming section of this README: md_widget_color.

Limiting Input Length

The code below will show a little indicator in the input dialog that tells the user how many characters they've typed. If they type less than 2 characters, or more than 20, the dialog won't allow the input to be submitted. It will also color the input field and character counter in error color passed for the third parameter.

If you pass 0 for the min length, there will be no min length. If you pass -1 for the max length, there will be no max length. If you don't pass a third parameter at all, it will default to Material red.

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
    .title(R.string.input)
    .inputRangeRes(2, 20, R.color.material_red_500)
    .input(null, null, new MaterialDialog.InputCallback() {
        @Override
        public void onInput(MaterialDialog dialog, CharSequence input) {
            // Do something
        }
    }).show();

*Note that inputRangeRes(int, int, int) takes a color resource ID for the third parameter, while inputRange(int, int, int) takes a literal color integer for the second parameter. You can use either one, or use the variation that doesn't take a third parameter at all.

Custom Invalidation

The easiest way to invalidate (enable or disable the EditText based on whether you think the input is acceptable) input dialogs is to call alwaysCallInputCallback() from the Builder so that the callback is invoked every time the user changes their input. From there, you can constantly check what they've typed. If you decide they shouldn't be able to submit that, you can disable the submit button using this from within the callback:

dialog.getActionButton(DialogAction.POSITIVE).setEnabled(false);

This library allows you to display progress dialogs with Material design that even use your app's accent color to color the progress bars (if you use AppCompat to theme your app, or the Material theme on Lollipop).

Proguard

Normally, ObjectAnimator in the context it's used in this library (for custom progress drawables) would need special proguard rules so that certain elements aren't removed when your app is built in release mode. Luckily, AAR packages are allowed to specify proguard rules that get included in apps that depend on them. So you do not need to worry about including any Proguard rules in order to ensure progress bars behave well.

Indeterminate Progress Dialogs

This will display the classic progress dialog with a spinning circle, see the sample project to see it in action:

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
    .title(R.string.progress_dialog)
    .content(R.string.please_wait)
    .progress(true, 0)
    .show();

Determinate (Seek Bar) Progress Dialogs

If a dialog is not indeterminate, it displays a horizontal progress bar that increases up until a max value. The comments in the code explain what this does.

// Create and show a non-indeterminate dialog with a max value of 150
// If the showMinMax parameter is true, a min/max ratio will be shown to the left of the seek bar.
boolean showMinMax = true;
MaterialDialog dialog = new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
    .title(R.string.progress_dialog)
    .content(R.string.please_wait)
    .progress(false, 150, showMinMax)
    .show();

// Loop until the dialog's progress value reaches the max (150)
while (dialog.getCurrentProgress() != dialog.getMaxProgress()) {
    // If the progress dialog is cancelled (the user closes it before it's done), break the loop
    if (dialog.isCancelled()) break;
    // Wait 50 milliseconds to simulate doing work that requires progress
    try {
        Thread.sleep(50);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        break;
    }
    // Increment the dialog's progress by 1 after sleeping for 50ms
    dialog.incrementProgress(1);
}

// When the loop exits, set the dialog content to a string that equals "Done"
dialog.setContent(getString(R.string.done));

See the sample project for this dialog in action, with the addition of threading.

Make an Indeterminate Dialog Horizontal

By default, indeterminate progress dialogs use a circular progress indicator. From the Builder, you can tell the dialog that it needs to use a horizontal indicator when displaying an indeterminate progress dialog:

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
    .title(R.string.progress_dialog)
    .content(R.string.please_wait)
    .progress(true, 0)
    .progressIndeterminateStyle(true)
    .show();

Coloring the Progress Bar

Like action buttons and many other elements of the Material dialog, you can customize the color of a progress dialog's progress bar. The Builder class contains a widgetColor(), widgetColorRes(), and widgetColorAttr() method. Their names and parameter annotations make them self explanatory. Note that by default, progress bars will be colored with the color held in colorAccent (for AppCompat) or android:colorAccent (for the Material theme) in your Activity's theme.

There's also a global theming attribute as shown in the Global Theming section of this README: md_widget_color.

Custom Number and Progress Formats

Like the stock ProgressDialog, you can format the progress min/max numbers and the percentage indicator of determinate dialogs.

MaterialDialog dialog = new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
    .progress(false, 150, true)
    ...
    .progressNumberFormat("%1d/%2d")
    .progressPercentFormat(NumberFormat.getPercentageInstance())
    ...
    .show();

The values passed above are the default.


You can use the MDTintHelper class to dynamically color check boxes, radio buttons, edit texts, and progress bars (to get around not being able to change styles.xml at runtime). It is used in the library to dynamically color UI elements to match your set widgetColor.


If you don't want the dialog to automatically be dismissed when an action button is pressed or when the user selects a list item:

MaterialDialog dialog = new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
        // ... other initialization
        .autoDismiss(false)
        .show();

The Builder is used like this:

// Pass AppCompatActivity which implements ColorCallback, along with the title of the dialog
new ColorChooserDialog.Builder(this, R.string.color_palette)
    .titleSub(R.string.colors)  // title of dialog when viewing shades of a color
    .accentMode(accent)  // when true, will display accent palette instead of primary palette
    .doneButton(R.string.md_done_label)  // changes label of the done button
    .cancelButton(R.string.md_cancel_label)  // changes label of the cancel button
    .backButton(R.string.md_back_label)  // changes label of the back button
    .preselect(accent ? accentPreselect : primaryPreselect)  // optionally preselects a color
    .dynamicButtonColor(true)  // defaults to true, false will disable changing action buttons' color to currently selected color
    .show();

The Activity you show the dialog in must implement ColorCallback:

public class MyActivity implements ColorChooserDialog.ColorCallback {

    // ...

    @Override
    public void onColorSelection(@NonNull ColorChooserDialog dialog, @ColorInt int color) {
        // TODO
    }
}

You can also specify custom colors to be displayed if you don't want to use the built-in primary or accent color palettes (which consist of the entire Material Design Color Palette):

int[] primary = new int[] {
    Color.parseColor("#F44336")
};
int[][] secondary = new int[][] {
    new int[] { Color.parseColor("#EF5350"), Color.parseColor("#F44336"), Color.parseColor("#E53935") }
};

new ColorChooserDialog.Builder(this, R.string.color_palette)
    .titleSub(R.string.colors)
    .customColors(primary, secondary)
    .show();

The first parameter for primary colors can also take an array resource (R.array.colors), which can be seen in the sample project. If you pass null for the second parameter, there will be no sub levels displayed for top level colors.

Finding Visible Dialogs

Since the ColorChooserDialog is a DialogFragment, it attaches to your Activity through its FragmentManager. ColorChooserDialog has a utility method called findVisible(AppCompatActivity, String) that will find a visible color chooser if any is visible:

ColorChooserDialog primary = ColorChooserDialog.findVisible(this, ColorChooserDialog.TAG_PRIMARY);

ColorChooserDialog accent = ColorChooserDialog.findVisible(this, ColorChooserDialog.TAG_ACCENT);

ColorChooserDialog custom = ColorChooserDialog.findVisible(this, ColorChooserDialog.TAG_CUSTOM);

User Color Input

By default, color chooser dialogs allow the user to input a custom color using RGB sliders or a Hexadecimal input field. This can be disabled if you don't want users to be able to use it:

new ColorChooserDialog.Builder(this, R.string.color_palette)
    .allowUserColorInput(false)
    .customButton(R.string.md_custom_label)
    .presetsButton(R.string.md_presets_label)
    .show();

If you want the user to be able to input a custom color, but don't want them to be able to change transparency (alpha):

new ColorChooserDialog.Builder(this, R.string.color_palette)
    .allowUserColorInputAlpha(false)
    .customButton(R.string.md_custom_label)
    .presetsButton(R.string.md_presets_label)
    .show();

Android's EditTextPreference, ListPreference, and MultiSelectListPreference allow you to associate a preference activity's settings with user input that's received through typing or selection. Material Dialogs includes MaterialEditTextPreference, MaterialListPreference, and MaterialMultiSelectListPreference classes that can be used in your preferences XML to automatically use Material-themed dialogs. See the sample project for details.


The Builder is used like this:

// Pass AppCompatActivity which implements FolderCallback
new FolderChooserDialog.Builder(this)
    .chooseButton(R.string.md_choose_label)  // changes label of the choose button
    .initialPath("/sdcard/Download")  // changes initial path, defaults to external storage directory
    .show();

The Activity you show the dialog in must implement FolderCallback:

public class MyActivity implements FolderChooserDialog.FolderCallback {

    // ...

    @Override
    public void onFolderSelection(File folder) {
        // TODO
    }
}

Simple List Dialogs are a specific style of list dialogs taken from the Material Design Guidelines: https://www.google.com/design/spec/components/dialogs.html#dialogs-simple-dialogs

This library's implementation is just a pre-made adapter that you can pass to the MaterialDialog.Builder.

final MaterialSimpleListAdapter adapter = new MaterialSimpleListAdapter(this);
adapter.add(new MaterialSimpleListItem.Builder(this)
    .content("username@gmail.com")
    .icon(R.drawable.ic_account_circle)
    .backgroundColor(Color.WHITE)
    .build());
adapter.add(new MaterialSimpleListItem.Builder(this)
    .content("user02@gmail.com")
    .icon(R.drawable.ic_account_circle)
    .backgroundColor(Color.WHITE)
    .build());
adapter.add(new MaterialSimpleListItem.Builder(this)
    .content(R.string.add_account)
    .icon(R.drawable.ic_content_add)
    .iconPaddingDp(8)
    .build());

new MaterialDialog.Builder(this)
    .title(R.string.set_backup)
    .adapter(adapter, new MaterialDialog.ListCallback() {
        @Override
        public void onSelection(MaterialDialog dialog, View itemView, int which, CharSequence text) {
            MaterialSimpleListItem item = adapter.getItem(which);
            // TODO
        }
    })
    .show();